Can Dogs Eat Licorice?

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Can dogs eat licorice?
In short, no. The black licorice treat that us humans eat as a sweet snack is unhealthy for dogs due to the high levels of sugar. Furthermore, the licorice plant itself contains glycyrrhizin. Consuming too much glycyrrhizin can become toxic to your dog, ultimately increasing their blood pressure. It is important to note, the licorice root itself is a herbal remedy and has proven to help ease arthritis pain in dogs’. 



Can Dogs Have Licorice or Licorice Root?

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As previously mentioned, the licorice sweets are not ideal for dogs due to the high levels of sugar. However, if your dog was to eat a couple by mistake, do not be worried as it will unlikely be harmful. The licorice root has been known to help dogs with problems such as arthritis. The licorice root has been used for a number of years as an anti-inflammatory herbal remedy, see below for more information!



Health Benefits


Anti-inflammatory 
The licorice root can help dogs with muscle and joint pain as well as arthritis. Furthermore, it can also help with gastrointestinal inflammation and internal ulcers. 

Healthy Liver
The herbal remedy can help improve the health of a dogs liver as it encourages the production of interferon and T-cells. If a dog has suffered from liver diseases such as jaundice or ingested toxins, licorice can help treat any damage caused. 



Health Concerns


Glycyrrhizin Poisoning
Too much licorice from the root can cause Glycyrrhizin Poisoning. This causes the potassium inside the dogs’ body to fall dangerously low and irregular heart rhythms may occur, as well as high blood pressure and swelling around the stomach area. If you think your dog has had too much licorice root, you should keep a close eye on them and look out for these symptoms;

> Vomiting

> Lethargic

> Loss of Appetite

> Diarrhea

> Abdominal Cramps/Pain

If your dog starts to show these signs, you should call an emergency or local veterinarian straight away to seek professional advice and assistance.

Sugar-free Licorice

Annoyingly (for dogs and their owners), some licorice brands changed their licorice ingredients to include xylitol, which is a substitute sweetener used in a lot of sugar-free products. 
Xylitol causes a quick release of insulin in your canine friends, which unfortunately causes a decrease in blood sugar levels. If this is left untreated, it can be life-threatening for your dog. This process is called hypoglycemia and can occur 30-60 minutes after xylitol consumption. 
To ensure that this does not happen to your dog, carefully read the label of the licorice product to make sure it does not include xylitol. If you're unsure whether your dog has eaten licorice containing xylitol, contact your veterinarian nurse as soon as possible to seek further advice. 



Healthier Alternative Dog Treats 

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There are a variety of other snacks for dogs that provide them with high levels of nutrients, vitamins, and minerals. Most of the snacks are fruit and vegetables, as these tend to be low in calories yet high in nutrition. 

Rather than just feeding the healthy snacks to your dogs, why not make them work for it in stimulating and exciting games!? Click here for cognitive & stimulating games. 
Below we have provided a variety of pretzel snack alternatives. The information will give you an insight into the nutritional benefits of each fruit and vegetable and why they're suitable for dogs. 

Apple Chunks
Apple chunks are an excellent treat snack for dogs as it provides them with Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and fiber. It is also low in calories, and they're a healthy and safe way of satisfying your dog's sweet tooth, a replacement for toxic foods such as chocolate or high-calorie shop bought treats. 
Chewing harder foods such as apples is also good for your dogs' dental health. However, it is important to note that this shouldn't be a replacement for their standard dental treatments. 
Vitamin A helps to maintain your dogs' shiny coat, muscle strength, and visibility through the night. Broccoli provides 54IU of vitamin A per 100g towards your dogs' daily recommendation (22 to 47 IU per KG of dogs weight).
Vitamin C helps your dogs' immune system to strengthen, thus enhancing their ability to fight off diseases and illnesses. If your dog is to become stressed or anxious, their vitamin C levels may drop. Apples provide your dog with 4.6mg of Vitamin C per 100g of apple. 

Celery Bites
Celery is an excellent snack choice for dogs. It is low in calories, fat, and cholesterol and also is an excellent source of fiber, vitamins A, C & K. The crunchy veggie helps to improve a dog's dental health as well as freshening their breath, something most owners would like!
Due to the size and texture of celery, it is important to chop it up into small bite-size pieces as it could be a choking hazard for your dogs. 
 
Blueberries
Blueberries are an excellent choice of snack for your dog. They are super low in calories yet have high amounts of vitamin C & K, fiber, and antioxidants. Vitamin C and fiber are important components of a canine's diet, as well as the antioxidants that help fight off diseases, illnesses and decrease the risk of arthritis in older dogs.
Blueberries also make an excellent choice of snack due to their size—no need for slicing and dicing, straight out of the packet into your dog's bowl. Ensure you don't leave the blueberries alone with your pup; otherwise, there'll be some mighty clean up operation to come!
 
Bananas
Bananas are high in potassium, vitamin B6, and vitamin C. Some highly qualified veterinarians recommend this fruit as a natural replacement for shop-bought treats that can be high in fat and calories. However, like with all 'human' foods, it should be given to your dog in moderation and ensure they're not allergic to it. 
Bananas are best peeled and sliced for your furry friend; however, if they do eat the skin, you do not need to worry as it is not toxic. Finely slicing the banana into small chunks will help avoid any potential choking hazards. 
If you have any mentally stimulating dog toys, for example, a kong, you can mush the banana up and put it inside the kong, this works great and keeps your dog occupied for an extended period of time.
 
Carrot Sticks
Carrots are an excellent snack for dogs due to them being super nutritious and easily affordable. Cooked or raw carrots are full of nutritious vitamins and minerals, including; vitamin A & B6, fiber, potassium, and biotin. 
Frozen carrots are a great teething tool for young pups who have discomforting teeth pain. You can also give frozen carrots to older dogs; this will act as a chew toy and improve their dental health.



FAQs

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Are Bananas Good For Dogs?
Yes! Bananas are high in potassium, vitamin B6, and vitamin C. Some highly qualified veterinarians recommend this fruit as a natural replacement for shop-bought treats that can be high in fat and calories. However, like with all 'human' foods, it should be given to your dog in moderation and ensure they're not allergic to it. 

Can Dogs Eat Watermelon?

Yes! It can be a healthy, hydrating, and refreshing snack for all dog breeds. There are many ways to feed this delicious treat to your dogs, from fresh, freezing, to dehydrating. However, it should be given as a treat in moderation. 

Can Dogs Eat Apples?

Apple chunks are an excellent treat snack for dogs as it provides them with Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and fiber. It is also low in calories, and they're a healthy and safe way of satisfying your dog's sweet tooth, a replacement for toxic foods such as chocolate or high-calorie shop bought treats. 

 

 



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Disclaimer: Each dog is different, and every circumstance is different. All efforts have been made to provide accurate information. However, it is not provided by a qualified Veterinarian, Veterinarian Surgeon, or Behaviorist. The information provided is purely educational. The information should not be used as an alternative or substitute for medical care. If you have any health or medical concerns, contact a qualified Veterinary Surgeon or Veterinarian immediately.

 

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